Intercultural coaching and psychotherapy

The area of intercultural communication has been both a personal and a professional passion for many years. Since 1992 I have been involved in dealing with intercultural issues and mediation of cultural-specific communication patterns in a variety of professional contexts. Of course, my experience here as well as that acquired as a foreign language instructor and in project management, flow into the coaching and psychotherapy work I do.

 

I have developed my own approach to help others achieve culture-sensitive communication, whereby I clearly differentiate this from “knowledge of culture”. I am more interested in the development of personal competencies that can also lead to constructive interpersonal interaction, despite a lack of knowledge about a specific culture (no one has enough knowledge). I believe that cultures are dynamic in nature, and that people can interact with one another in such a way that they negotiate and create a shared (sub)-culture. How this can be achieved depends on your personal background and needs.

 

 

In my work, two central issues play an important role:

 

  • Simply put: I think that people can be categorized according to one of two styles of communication. Some people communicate more directly and clearly indicate what they need or want. Others communicate more indirectly or “talk around the bush.” According to research on intercultural communication, people in different cultures can categorized according to a preference to adopt one of these two communication styles. Most people are unaware of these culturally-defined preferences. However, most people have a heightened perception of certain behaviors that disturb or upset them. And they respond to such in a manner that they have learned since childhood. With respect to communication and interaction in intercultural contexts, it is crucial to be able to understand and deal with the needs of those who possess a different communication style from our own. In short, when people feel that they are really not understood, this can negatively affect interactions in teams, how conflict is dealt with, or even self-worth.

  • Furthermore, some people are born and raised in cultures that have very different ideas about collectivity and individuality from our own. For me, it is essential to recognize how this affects our perceptions and interactions, not by asking “inquisitorial” questions but by asking appropriate questions at the right moments. The individuation of a person in the one majority culture simply occurs differently than for people that who grow up in an individualistically-oriented society. These culture-specific experiences affect how you present yourself, your decision-making processes, your leadership abilities, and how you deal with issues in a team setting. For me, understanding the connection to family, its effect on feelings of self-worth and how it is embedded in personal decisions represent “classic” topics of intercultural guidance, whether in coaching or in therapy.

 

SANGITA POPAT M.A.

HERSELER STRASSE 18

53111 BONN

0228 - 90 27 83 33

SANGITA POPAT M.A.

HERSELER STRASSE 18 | 53111 BONN

0228 - 90 27 83 33

SANGITA POPAT M.A.

HERSELER STRASSE 18

53111 BONN

0228 - 90 27 83 33